Retreat from the Social: a review of Hegel’s Theory of Madness by Daniel Berthold-Bond, Suny Press, 1995

Joanna Moncrieff

I read some Hegel in a reading group a few years ago and was bowled over by it. So I was excited to find a book that analyses Hegel’s ideas about the nature of madness, and wanted to review it even though it was written 20 years ago.

Hegel may not have been the first to have made this point, but for me his writing brings home, more clearly than any other thinker, the intrinsically social nature of human thought and existence. For Hegel, we come to be the fully formed and self-conscious beings that we are through our interaction with the external world, an interaction that we make sense of through the concepts (language) we inherit from our social community. Only when we recognise the independent existence of something outside of ourselves do we begin to fully comprehend our own individual existence. We recognise ourselves as ourselves only…

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Un pensamiento en “Retreat from the Social: a review of Hegel’s Theory of Madness by Daniel Berthold-Bond, Suny Press, 1995

  1. […] way, that there is a truth outside to be found. Opposite to that, as Joanna Moncrieff writes (here), “Hegel presents madness as a state of social withdrawal from an alienating […]

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